Hello there, Adele.

Adele-Vinyl-cover

Adele has just recently released her single ‘Hello’, taken from her new album, 25, (release date: 20 November).
The song is great. Like really. Which is why I decided to pull out my (rather dusty) inks and brushes and while listening to this goosebumping song far too many times, I did an Adele-portrait-meets-lyrics piece.
I ended up simplifying the original artwork in Photoshop because there was just too much text… this should explain why not all the lyrics made it on in the end. But that’s just the fine print. Who reads fine print anyway? (I’m joking)

1I started the painting as an A3 landscape (I’m not sure why that made sense at the time) which was just a bit too big to fit in my scanner at the end. So the only way to really digitise it (other than photographing, but that’s not accurate enough) was to scan in the image half a side at a time, left then right with enough overlap each time. And yay Photoshop (and Google for showing me the answer) and its highly impressive automatic stitching command: Photomerge (File > Automate > Photomerge).

Stitched-Trio
1. I was originally going to manually try match up and layer the two scans myself – this would’ve taken a lot more time, effort and inaccuracy.
2. This shows the stitching that PS did by itself. Pretty incredible. I pulled the two pieces apart just to show how it merged the two separate images so perfectly together. I initially thought it was already flattened because it looked so natural.
3. How it looked immediately after it finished rendering the Photomerge. SEAMLESS!!


Adele by Amy SlatemFinal artwork ^^
Reminiscent of Billy Joel’s Piano Man actually…


Adele-OriginalThe original artwork scanned in (more text – but it looked too much like a beard so I erased it)


Adele-eyesAdele se oogbolletjies. (detail)


PROCESS PHOTOS…42


In case you STILL haven’t heard it…

Joburg Art Fair 2015

jaf-cover

Having heard a number of good reviews about it, I went to go check out the Joburg Art Fair held at the Sandton Convention Centre for myself this weekend. Mmmm… there really was such a great collection of diverse contemporary art featuring some big names in the South African art scene and beyond.
It’s was definitely well worth it being able to see the work of artists I know of and have learnt about in school and varsity, or just generally admire. Let’s name drop a bit off the top of my head… William Kentridge, Lionel Smit, Athi-Patra Ruga, Ed Young, Brett Murray, Nigel Mullins, Nicholas Hlobo, Anton Kannemeyer, Roger Ballen and so many more.
Overall, it was well worth the R130 entrance for an afternoon spent walking around the lovely venue looking at works up close, then afar and getting to bond with my camera for a change and being able to admire the textures and painterly/material details of the actual artworks made by hands I admire.
So I’m sorry if you missed it, cause you missed out. Maybe next year, doll…

35-NigelNigel Mullins

6
Johannes Pokela

2619_comboOne of my favourites (the artist’s name wasn’t there, sadly). Loved the realism left to clash with the loose brushstrokes and white canvas.

31Claudette Schreuders

217-Lionel-combo
Lionel Smit

16-Lionel-comboLionel Smit

8 9 11-Cloe-ReidCloe Ried

1329-Ed-Young
Ed Young, Buttercup

20_skullboySkullboy (If only I had R12 000 lying around… Love this guy!)

Continue reading

2012 (2nd semester)

Final art work. Oils on canvas (30x40 inches)

Final art work. Oils on canvas (30×40 inches)

This is a recent advert for DSTV, with the caption “When some things are more important than rugby”.

Les Infideles (“The Players”) 30×40 inches oil on canvas

“It’ll blow your mind away” (caption from a Burger King print advert). 40×30 inch oil on canvas
THE PORTRAYALS OF WOMEN IN CONTEMPORARY MEDIAThis is my current (23 July – 8 Nov 2012) extended body of art works based on the portrayals of women in contemporary media and advertisements.

Each work is based on a real and published contemporary commercial or printed advert with the caption/punchline inserted to highlight  and satirize the portrayal of women in media today.

In every instant where a female is featured, they are replaced with that of a cow: the animal bred for either meat (which symbolises the objectification and sexualisation of women) or on the other hand, for reproduction (which speaks back to how women are pictured in the kitchen and perpetuate women’s naturalised motherly role).

This series of oil paintings (comprising of the few large 30×40 inch oil paintings on canvas and the many smaller +-14x15cm oils on fabriano paper) aims to highlight and draw attention to the manner of representing women in common everyday media and how they perpetuate gender roles and objectification. The substitution of the cow figures helps add absurdity and humour.